Em in Asia!

My Experiences Living and Teaching in South Korea

Hair CURLiosity

May30

My BAD student has very interesting hair. It… well… kind of looks like he’s been electrocuted. He’s got really thick hair, that he styles so that it goes up and falls over the front and left side of his head, almost like a tsunami. Our school’s hair regulations are fairly strict (at least, for the male students – the female students can get away with much more) so while there are a few boys that have slightly more outrageous haircuts, or use hair wax (Hongdae being one of those), most of them toe the line.

I was convinced that BAD was blatantly breaking school regulations and had gotten a perm (as were most of the other English teachers – BAD’s hair is a fun topic to gossip about), but according to his homeroom teacher he’s actually following the rules. What happens is every morning he wakes up early and curls his hair by hand. Only in Korea…

posted under School
2 Comments to

“Hair CURLiosity”

  1. Avatar June 13th, 2012 at 6:51 pm Janine@Barber Shop Says:

    LMAO!!! seriously he does curl it with his hand? Why does he have to do that? He can always get a curling iron.


  2. Avatar June 14th, 2012 at 10:54 am epotosky Says:

    I have no idea… it would make more sense to get a curling iron, right? Anyway, I really want to ask him to confirm if this rumor is true or not, but I can’t think of a good way to do that without completely embarrassing him. Then again, he’s the one curling his hair by hand every morning…


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안녕하세요! My name is Emily and when I started this blog I had received a 2010 – 2011 F*lbright grant to teach English in South Korea.  I then decided to apply to renew my grant, so I am now staying in Korea until July 2012. This blog is not an official F*lbright Program blog, and the views expressed are my own and not those of the F*lbright Program, the U.S. Department of State or any of its partner organizations.

I graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in Philosophy Pre-Law and Classical Civilizations, and found myself 3 months later teaching English at SGHS. The town that I taught in, SG, is a small town of 12,000 people, an “읍” (eup) rather than a “시” (shi – city), and though it was sometimes hard teaching in such a small town I really enjoyed the unique experience of being the first foreign teacher SGHS had ever had. I lived in the largest part of the county which is significantly bigger (40,000 people) than the town the school is situated in, but is also considered rural by Korean standards.

During my second grant period (2011-2012) I decided to change schools and I currently teach at CPHS which is located in an even smaller town than previously, in Jeollanamdo.

This blog is meant to serve as a reflection not only of being a Native English Speaking teacher in Korea, but also of living as a foreigner in rural Korea.



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