Em in Asia!

My Experiences Living and Teaching in South Korea

The Ultra Skull Party

October31

This lovely party was created by a group of 5 boys in 2.9.

“1) What is your party’s name?

Ultra Skull Party

2) What is your party’s symbol?

Skull and Crossed Bones

3) What is your party platform

A. Issue 1: Defense
Stance: Increase the number of hackers and buy more weapons because we are responsible for our people’s safety. Also, we should make more women soldiers.

B. Issue 2: Education
Stance: We think children don’t have to take further education. When children graduate elementary school, they should go military to save our nation.

C. Issue 3: Trade
Stance: We think we can lend our armies to other countries and make money.

D. Issue 4: Civil Rights
Stance: We think people don’t have right to speech because we have tank, gun, etc.

What sort of monster have I helped create?

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안녕하세요! My name is Emily and when I started this blog I had received a 2010 – 2011 F*lbright grant to teach English in South Korea.  I then decided to apply to renew my grant, so I am now staying in Korea until July 2012. This blog is not an official F*lbright Program blog, and the views expressed are my own and not those of the F*lbright Program, the U.S. Department of State or any of its partner organizations.

I graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in Philosophy Pre-Law and Classical Civilizations, and found myself 3 months later teaching English at SGHS. The town that I taught in, SG, is a small town of 12,000 people, an “읍” (eup) rather than a “시” (shi – city), and though it was sometimes hard teaching in such a small town I really enjoyed the unique experience of being the first foreign teacher SGHS had ever had. I lived in the largest part of the county which is significantly bigger (40,000 people) than the town the school is situated in, but is also considered rural by Korean standards.

During my second grant period (2011-2012) I decided to change schools and I currently teach at CPHS which is located in an even smaller town than previously, in Jeollanamdo.

This blog is meant to serve as a reflection not only of being a Native English Speaking teacher in Korea, but also of living as a foreigner in rural Korea.



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