Em in Asia!

My Experiences Living and Teaching in South Korea

November6

This kid. Everytime I see him, it’s almost the exact same conversation. He’ll scream at me from across wherever, regardless of who else is around, and ask how I am.

EMILY HOW ARE YOU?

I’m fine, how are you?

I’MFINETHANKYOUANDYOU?

… I’m also fine.

GOOD SEE YOU LATER.

His friends egg him on, as do all of the teachers. This kid has no fear. His English is lower level than most of the students that choose to talk to me, he’s a half foot shorter than everyone in his friend group, and because he’s a first grader I’ve taught him a grand total of maybe fifteen times, but he’s fierce – a fierce little hipster kid with glasses, a giant muffler, and a cooler version of a bowl cut.

Today I ran into him twice. The first conversation went almost exactly like the one above, shouted at me as I walked into school slightly late this morning. The second conversation happened just now, after lunch, when I was with two other teachers who speak English well.

HI I AM YOUR BEST FRIEND. YOU KNOW THAT?

Haha yes I do. How are you?

I’M FINE.

[I wait for the “thank you and you, and it doesn’t come, rendering me momentarily stunned.]

DO YOU KNOW THAT I LOVE YOU?

… Um. Yes. Yes I do. Thank you.

OKAY!

Where are you going now?

I AM GOING TO STUDY.

Ah, where will you study?

I WILL STUDY WHERE I STUDY EVERYDAY IN MY CLASSROOM.

Okay. Good luck! Study hard!

THANKYOUBYE.

He then went to the convenience store to buy ice cream, not his classroom.

posted under School
4 Comments to

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  1. Avatar November 8th, 2012 at 4:08 am Reverend Says:

    Can I just say you are the best blogger on UMW Blogs. Period. Full stop. I love this kid now.


  2. Avatar November 8th, 2012 at 6:59 pm epotosky Says:

    You are too sweet. Really, it’s the kids – without them I’d be a sad, hollow shell of a blogger. Next semester I’ll teach this kid every week instead of once every two weeks so I’m excited to see how our relationship continues to develop, and if we still remain BFFs.


  3. Avatar November 12th, 2012 at 3:51 pm Em in Asia! » Blog Archive » Whimsy Says:

    […] Remember this kid? He’s been switching it up. Today when I met him he didn’t even ask me how I was. I guess he thinks we’ve progressed past small talk and onto topics of the heart. I was walking around outside after lunch because it was a beautiful day, and as I walked past the soccer field he and another first grade boy broke off from their game and ran towards me. This Kid: HIIIIIIIIIIII! Other Kid: HIIIIIIIIIIII! Me: HIIIIIIIIIIII! This Kid to the other kid: 야 왜 인사 했어? 에밀리 쌤에 말하지마! [Hey, why did you greet her? Don't talk to Emily teacher!] This Kid to me: DO YOU KNOW I AM YOUR BEST FRIEND? Me: Yes. You told me last week. This Kid: THEN WHY ARE YOU SO FRIENDLY WITH HIM? Other Kid to This Kid: She loves me best. Other Kid to me: One day I will marry you. Me: No, I’m sorry, the age difference is too big. It would be bad. Other Kid: Age is just… just a- This Kid: WAIT THREE YEARS. I WILL GRADUATE HERE THEN I WILL BE A UNIVERSITY. THEN I WILL BE NO LONGER A STUDENT. Me: No… you’ll still be a student. Just a university student. This Kid: IT DOES NOT MATTER. Me: Yeah. Sorry. Not happening. See you later. This Kid: BUT I LOVE YOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU. […]


  4. Avatar July 11th, 2013 at 10:46 am Em in Asia! » Blog Archive » Notes from CAPS LOCK KID Says:

    […] CAPS LOCK KID? He wrote me a very Caps locky […]


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안녕하세요! My name is Emily and when I started this blog I had received a 2010 – 2011 F*lbright grant to teach English in South Korea.  I then decided to apply to renew my grant, so I am now staying in Korea until July 2012. This blog is not an official F*lbright Program blog, and the views expressed are my own and not those of the F*lbright Program, the U.S. Department of State or any of its partner organizations.

I graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in Philosophy Pre-Law and Classical Civilizations, and found myself 3 months later teaching English at SGHS. The town that I taught in, SG, is a small town of 12,000 people, an “읍” (eup) rather than a “시” (shi – city), and though it was sometimes hard teaching in such a small town I really enjoyed the unique experience of being the first foreign teacher SGHS had ever had. I lived in the largest part of the county which is significantly bigger (40,000 people) than the town the school is situated in, but is also considered rural by Korean standards.

During my second grant period (2011-2012) I decided to change schools and I currently teach at CPHS which is located in an even smaller town than previously, in Jeollanamdo.

This blog is meant to serve as a reflection not only of being a Native English Speaking teacher in Korea, but also of living as a foreigner in rural Korea.



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