Em in Asia!

My Experiences Living and Teaching in South Korea

About

June14

안녕하세요! My name is Emily and when I started this blog I had received a 2010 – 2011 F*lbright grant to teach English in South Korea.  I then decided to apply to renew my grant, so I am now staying in Korea until July 2012. This blog is not an official F*lbright Program blog, and the views expressed are my own and not those of the F*lbright Program, the U.S. Department of State or any of its partner organizations.

I graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in Philosophy Pre-Law and Classical Civilizations, and found myself 3 months later teaching English at SGHS. The town that I taught in, SG, is a small town of 12,000 people, an “읍” (eup) rather than a “시” (shi – city), and though it was sometimes hard teaching in such a small town I really enjoyed the unique experience of being the first foreign teacher SGHS had ever had. I lived in the largest part of the county which is significantly bigger (40,000 people) than the town the school is situated in, but is also considered rural by Korean standards.

During my second grant period (2011-2012) I decided to change schools and I currently teach at CPHS which is located in an even smaller town than previously, in Jeollanamdo.

This blog is meant to serve as a reflection not only of being a Native English Speaking teacher in Korea, but also of living as a foreigner in rural Korea.

posted under
2 Comments to

“About”

  1. Avatar March 16th, 2013 at 4:45 am gstruck Says:

    Hello Emily,

    My name is Gorden Struck and I work with Leaslie and Ann at the CIE office here at UMW. I am thinking of teaching abroad after graduation (I’m a junior right now) and I am wondering if you may have any tips and info. And I was also wondering how you went about applying for the Fulbright program.

    Thanks!
    Gorden


  2. Avatar March 18th, 2013 at 2:42 pm epotosky Says:

    Hi Gorden!
    It’s good to hear that you’re considering teaching abroad. Do you have any countries in mind? Ultimately the application process is really going to vary from country to country, and I can only really speak for Korea. As for the Fulbright, I applied through our school. Be on the lookout for an email sometime in the late spring informing students of an info session. There should also be one in the fall. I didn’t even know about Fulbright until late my junior year, so you’re in a good spot.

    There are two types of Fulbrights that you are currently qualified for – the junior research grant and the English Teaching Assistantship. I’m currently receiving the later grant, though for most countries you can only stay for one year (Fulbright Korea lets you stay up to three years on an ETA grant). The application tends to be due mid-October your senior year (my year it was October 18th, though the campus deadline was October 15th). The on-campus Fulbright adviser will help you through the application process which was actually fairly similar to a college or graduate school application process in that it involved a personal statement, a statement of purpose, a resume, letters of recommendation, and transcripts. You then go through two rounds – basically you’re screened both in America and in the country you’re applying for. You’ll find out about the first round in March (I believe, it’s been awhile), and then in April/May you’ll find out if you were accepted.

    As for teaching WITHOUT a Fulbright… again I only really know about Korea. There are many avenues, but most people come through a recruiter of some sort. Dave’s Esl Cafe is a good place to browse job postings (though a lot of the forums are really mean-spirited, so I’d stay away from those) and get an idea of where you’d like to go and what type of position you want (a school versus a private academy, what level and where). In addition, many places in Korea are either starting to require or will pay you higher if you have a TESOL/TEFL certificate or degree. I don’t, but that’s because I’m with Fulbright. There are plenty of good online programs that will help you get that certificate without breaking the bank. Furthermore, even if your program doesn’t require the TESOL/TEFL, it might be a good idea to look into a class for your own edification. Teaching in a classroom is amazing… but nothing you’ve ever done has prepared you for it; it’s exhilarating and tiring at the same time.

    Is there anything specifically you want to know about teaching abroad/Fulbright? Let me know :).


Email will not be published

Website example

Your Comment:

안녕하세요! My name is Emily and when I started this blog I had received a 2010 – 2011 F*lbright grant to teach English in South Korea.  I then decided to apply to renew my grant, so I am now staying in Korea until July 2012. This blog is not an official F*lbright Program blog, and the views expressed are my own and not those of the F*lbright Program, the U.S. Department of State or any of its partner organizations.

I graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in Philosophy Pre-Law and Classical Civilizations, and found myself 3 months later teaching English at SGHS. The town that I taught in, SG, is a small town of 12,000 people, an “읍” (eup) rather than a “시” (shi – city), and though it was sometimes hard teaching in such a small town I really enjoyed the unique experience of being the first foreign teacher SGHS had ever had. I lived in the largest part of the county which is significantly bigger (40,000 people) than the town the school is situated in, but is also considered rural by Korean standards.

During my second grant period (2011-2012) I decided to change schools and I currently teach at CPHS which is located in an even smaller town than previously, in Jeollanamdo.

This blog is meant to serve as a reflection not only of being a Native English Speaking teacher in Korea, but also of living as a foreigner in rural Korea.



css.php