Em in Asia!

My Experiences Living and Teaching in South Korea

Lee Myeong Bak’s Energy Saving Policy

November30

“SEOUL, Nov. 28 (Yonhap) — President Lee Myung-bak called on South Koreans Monday to turn off unnecessary lighting, wear warmer underwear and take other voluntary power-saving steps, saying the country could face a shortage of electricity due to soaring demand…

‘Cooperation of all citizens is essential,’ he said.

‘I, for one, have recently lowered the thermostat in the place I work. Naturally, I had to wear warmer underwear which was uncomfortable initially. But after a while, I got used to it, and now I am very warm and comfortable wearing it,’ he said.

‘We can save energy beyond our expectations if we lower the temperature in houses and offices a little, turn off unnecessary lights during the night and use high-efficiency electric appliances,’ he said. ‘I urge businesses, civic organizations and the general public to participate in this campaign voluntarily.'”

Okay, LMB, I may not agree with everything you say but I agree that we need to conserve energy. Talking about your underwear though? See, this is why people make fun of you. Read the rest of the article here.

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안녕하세요! My name is Emily and when I started this blog I had received a 2010 – 2011 F*lbright grant to teach English in South Korea.  I then decided to apply to renew my grant, so I am now staying in Korea until July 2012. This blog is not an official F*lbright Program blog, and the views expressed are my own and not those of the F*lbright Program, the U.S. Department of State or any of its partner organizations.

I graduated from the University of Mary Washington with a degree in Philosophy Pre-Law and Classical Civilizations, and found myself 3 months later teaching English at SGHS. The town that I taught in, SG, is a small town of 12,000 people, an “읍” (eup) rather than a “시” (shi – city), and though it was sometimes hard teaching in such a small town I really enjoyed the unique experience of being the first foreign teacher SGHS had ever had. I lived in the largest part of the county which is significantly bigger (40,000 people) than the town the school is situated in, but is also considered rural by Korean standards.

During my second grant period (2011-2012) I decided to change schools and I currently teach at CPHS which is located in an even smaller town than previously, in Jeollanamdo.

This blog is meant to serve as a reflection not only of being a Native English Speaking teacher in Korea, but also of living as a foreigner in rural Korea.